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John James Audubon

Quick Overview

The Pontic Rhododendron
  • Taken from the original editions
  • Printed in the original size
  • Age resisting white etching paper
  • Archival ink resisting fading for 100 years
  • Highest possible resolution

Special offer:
  • Buy 1 print and get a second one of equal or lower price with 30% discount

Interested in complete collection or have a question? Click here  
Shipping info
Shipping costs unframed prints:

per order Rest of the World: USD $38

per order EU: USD $25

per order NL: USD $16

€111.60

Details

;A Museum Quality Limited Edition print, original size, signed, numbered and blind stamped. Indistinguishable form the original. With Certificate of Authenticity

Title of the print:
The Pontic Rhododendron, London, Published by Dr Thornton, Dec 1, 1802

Author:
Dr Robert Thornton (1768-1837)

Prints Artist:
Henderson

Prints publication: 
The Tempel of Flora
Temple of Flora, sometimes criticized for its scientific inaccuracy, is perhaps the single most famous of all florilegium. Dr. Robert Thornton was the driving force and visionary behind the creation of this great work. To produce it, he employed other artists and engravers. He intended to issue seventy plates dramatically and poetically illustrating Linnaeus’ discoveries about the sexual system of plants. It required the completion of only twenty-eight plates to bring financial ruin upon the well-stationed physician.
Dr Robert Thornton 1768 - 1837 Temple of Flora(1799-1804) Temple of Flora, sometimes criticized for its scientific inaccuracy, is perhaps the single most famous of all florilegium. Dr. Robert Thornton was the driving force and visionary behind the creation of this great work. To produce it, he employed other artists and engravers. He intended to issue seventy plates dramatically and poetically illustrating Linnaeus’ discoveries about the sexual system of plants. It required the completion of only twenty-eight plates to bring financial ruin upon the well-stationed physician. Our original contains thirty plates which were produced by a variety of techniques, including aquatint, mezzotint, stipple, and line engraving. The impressions were printed in colour and afterwards finished by hand. During production, most of the plates were altered or added to from time to time, producing a different 'state' in each case; consequently, some plates have as many as four different states. The project fell victim to Thorton’s almost fanatical attention to detail and the changing taste of a social elite who had become somewhat jaded by the preponderance of great flower books created during this period. In 1804, he opened a gallery in London. There he exhibited the original paintings and sold catalogs. The primary objective was to publicize the folio of engravings as it was being published and released. Desperate to continue funding his work, Thornton now embarked on his wildest scheme. He applied for and was granted permission by Parliament to hold a fantastic lottery. For prizes he produced a quarto, or miniature, edition of The Temple of Flora. First prize was to be the entire contents of the gallery. The lottery failed to attract ample participants and Thornton died destitute, financially ruined by his dream.
Our original contains thirty plates which were produced by a variety of techniques, including aquatint, mezzotint, stipple, and line engraving. The impressions were printed in colour and afterwards finished by hand. During production, most of the plates were altered or added to from time to time, producing a different 'state' in each case; consequently, some plates have as many as four different states.
The project fell victim to Thorton’s almost fanatical attention to detail and the changing taste of a social elite who had become somewhat jaded by the preponderance of great flower books created during this period. In 1804, he opened a gallery in London. There he exhibited the original paintings and sold catalogs. The primary objective was to publicize the folio of engravings as it was being published and released.
Desperate to continue funding his work, Thornton now embarked on his wildest scheme. He applied for and was granted permission by Parliament to hold a fantastic lottery. For prizes he produced a quarto, or miniature, edition of The Temple of Flora. First prize was to be the entire contents of the gallery. The lottery failed to attract ample participants and Thornton died destitute, financially ruined by his dream.
Provenance:
This Heritage Facsimile print is made from an extremely well-preserved early museum original subscription which has been cared for in the hands of this one owner only – Teylers Museum (the oldest museum of the Netherlands).

Technique:
Museum Quality Facsimile Giclee Print.

Our Audubon Heritage Editions Collection are true facsimiles from these beautiful originals because Heritage Editions prints  are carefully compared and corrected with the originals and the final prints always have the original size. As a result, the naked eye is unable to distinguish the originals from the facsimile prints when framed and glazed. To ensure the durability, our facsimiles are printed on 268g/m acid-free paper with archive ink.
Paper size:
45,0 x 55,0 cm; 21.2/3 x 17.3/4 inch

Certificate of Authenticity:
On demand

We offer a true quality nobody has; and for a price nobody is offering you for a comparable quality. This print was photographed using the latest technology, colour matched to the original illustration and then reproduced at the original plate size.

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