Customer Service: +31 318 64 08 57

My Cart:

0 item(s) - $0.00
You have no items in your shopping cart.

0

Edward Donovan

Edward Donovan

Edward Donovan (1768–1837) was an Anglo Irish writer, natural history illustrator and amateur zoologist. Born in Cork, Ireland, Donovan was an avid collector of natural history specimens purchased mainly at auctions of specimens from voyages of exploration. In 1807 he founded the London Museum and Institute of Natural History. This exhibited several hundred cases of world birds, mammals, reptiles, fish, molluscs, insects, corals and other invertebrates and botanical specimens and other exotica alongside his British collections.

Items 1 to 30 of 60 total

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2

Grid  List 

Items 1 to 30 of 60 total

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2

Grid  List 

Donovan was, at first, the very successful author of a number of natural history titles, including Natural History of British Birds (1792–97), Natural History of British Insects (1792–1813), Natural History of British Fishes (1802–08) and the two-volume Descriptive Excursions through South Wales and Monmouthshire in the Year 1804, and the Four Preceding Summers (1805) and the short-lived Botanical Review, or the Beauties of Flora (London, 1789–90). He also wrote articles on Conchology, Entomology etc , made drawings and arranged the natural history plates in Rees's Cyclopædia and undertook commissions for private albums of his botanical artwork. His best known works are: An Epitome of the Natural History of the Insects of China (1798) An Epitome of the Natural History of the Insects of India (1800) An Epitome of the Natural History of the Insects of New Holland' (1805). His Insects of New Holland is based on specimens collected by Joseph Banks and William Bayly an astronomer on the second and third voyages of James Cook, specimens in the collection of Dru Drury and other private collections as well as his own museum. It is the first publication dealing exclusively with the insects of Australia. Most of the plates depict butterflies together with exotic plants. Donovan often used thick paints, burnished highlights, albumen overglazes and metallic paints. These covered the engravings (from his own copper plates, Donovan personally undertook all steps of the illustration process for his books, the drawing, the etching and engraving and the handcolouring) which are not visible. At other times the fineness of his engraving and etching is apparent giving his illustrations the appearance of being watercolours. For An Epitome of the Natural History of the Insects of China he obtained specimens and information from George Macartney a British envoy to China. The source of the specimens in Insects of India is less clear. It is the first illustrated publication dealing with the entomology of India.
video-trigger